This is the second part of a two-part series detailing what Nabholz is doing to recruit students to the construction industry. Find the first part here. 

Whether college is in a recent graduate’s future or not, the construction industry sets itself apart from other industries by providing various paths that lead to management positions, some requiring a college education, others relying on trade education and work history. Nabholz offers two such defined paths.

Internships that Enhance College Experience

Construction-related degrees are some of the top performing four-year degrees available to college students today. In fact, the construction degree ranked ninth on Forbes’ 2016 list of the bachelor’s degrees with the highest starting salaries with an average of $50,000. Moreover, the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ predicts that there will be 1.6 million new jobs in the field by 2022.
Internships smooth the way for both company’s seeking employees and new graduates seeking jobs. Less than 39% of students who received a job offer prior to graduation did not have any internship experience (nor did they participate in a cooperative work-study program), according to a report from the National Association of Colleges and Employers. The report additionally states that only 39.5 percent of students who had unpaid internships received a job offer, only slightly higher than the offer rate for students with no internship experience at all (38.6 percent).
Nabholz offers paid summer internships to juniors and seniors working towards construction-related degrees. These internships are mutually beneficial. It provides students with real-world mentors and opportunities that enhance their classwork. Our interns receive competitive wages, a guaranteed 40-hour workweek, and interview upon completion of a successful internship. Nabholz uses these internships to seek out project engineers. We have several internships open on our website now.

Apprenticeships Alternatives to College

Nabholz also realizes college is not a viable option for many students for a number of reasons. Some students wouldn’t be able to afford to go to college without taking on a massive amount of debt. Others see college alternatives, such as going to a trade school, as an opportunity to earn a living and gain experience while going to school. Still others enjoy working with their hands and prefer to learn skills in a hands-on environment.
We are constantly educating those students who choose not to pursue a four-year degree about the various career paths in construction. We do this in part through promoting our apprenticeship program. Since its establishment in 1973, the program has produced more than 160 journeyman carpenters, many who have since become superintendents, project managers, and upper management. Instruction isn’t limited to just the classroom–instructors guide students through real-world, hands-on project experiences. Upon graduating, students receive a diploma from the US Department of Labor and Nabholz University.